FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #67

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

If you got people to buy shares in a new business you were starting and the business failed despite your best efforts, would you feel you should pay back the money they invested?

I wouldn’t get people to buy shares in a new business I were starting–I’d go it alone, or not at all.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #66

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

Do you believe that wealth in our society is fairly apportioned according to what people contribute?

Of course not.

If not, what is the most glaring inequity you know?

That between true public servants and the politicians under which they serve.

What do teachers, police officers, firefighters, and even soldiers all have in common?

They serve under politicians.

This country once had true leaders, but no longer.

Now it just has politicians.

And these goddamned politicians get paid so much more money than the true public servants, it’s disgraceful!

Teachers earn much, but are paid almost nothing.

Police officers earn much, but are paid almost nothing.

Firefighters earn much, but are paid almost nothing.

Soldiers earn much, but are paid almost nothing.

And the politicians under which teachers, police officers, firefighters, and soldiers serve?

These goddamned politicians earn almost nothing, but are paid much!

And teachers, police officers, firefighters, and soldiers are not the only true public servants who contribute much, but are paid almost nothing–there are many more.

I respect leaders, but I despise politicians.

Leaders serve others as well as themselves; politicians serve only themselves.

I remember a T-shirt I saw in an army surplus store once, which read, VIETNAM: GOOD SOLDIERS, GUTLESS POLITICIANS.

And that sums it up better than anything else I can think of.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #65

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

If you, as owner of a company, had to either abruptly lay off loyal employees or suffer losses heavy enough to imperil the company, which would you do?

I’d suffer losses heavy enough to imperil the company.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #64

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

What is the biggest effort you have ever made to influence public policy? 

I’ve voted my conscience in every election since 1990.

Unfortunately, that’s the most I’ve ever had the power to do–at least to my knowledge.

If you decided you had to do something about the public issue you feel most strongly about, what could you do that would have the most impact?

This is something with which I struggle every day.

There is no single issue I feel most strongly about–there are many.

But I have no power to do anything about any of them that would have any significant impact.

I have no power, and I have little influence in this accursed era in which I live.

And this infuriates me to no end!

A GOOD REMINDER FOR ALL OF US

Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of the facts and evidence.

John Adams

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #63

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

Would you favor decriminalizing all drugs if you knew it would dramatically reduce violent crime but greatly increase the death toll from drug abuse?

It would depend on the extent of the reduction of violent crime, in relation to that of the increase in the death toll from drug abuse.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #62

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

Would you like every product to be taxed so that its price includes payment for what it indirectly costs society?

No.

For example, should the price of cigarettes be raised so that smokers pay for the added medical costs they incur?

No.

Should gasoline taxes be increased so that motorists bear the costs of pollution and acid rain?

No.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #61

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

What would be your biggest misgiving about becoming a business partner with your brother or sister?

That he or she were another person.

I would not become a business partner with anyone–it would further complicate a complicated venture.

THE LEAST I CAN DO

Scott MayoScott Mayo 2Scott Mayo 3

THE ESTABLISHMENT AND CONTINUED SUPPORT OF THE ZIONIST STATE (“ISRAEL”) IS AN ONGOING ATROCITY AGAINST THE ARAB PEOPLE AND AGAINST MUSLIMS, IN GENERAL.

I DIDN’T COME HERE OF MY OWN ACCORD

All day I think about it, then at night I say it.

Where did I come from, and what am I supposed to be doing?

I have no idea.

My soul is from elsewhere, I’m sure of that,

and I intend to end up there.

 

This drunkenness began in some other tavern.

When I get back around to that place,

I’ll be completely sober.  Meanwhile,

I’m like a bird from another continent, sitting in this aviary.

The day is coming when I fly off,

but who is it now in my ear who hears my voice?

Who says words with my mouth?

 

Who looks out with my eyes?  What is the soul?

I cannot stop asking.

If I could taste one sip of an answer,

I could break out of this prison for drunks.

I didn’t come here of my own accord, and I can’t leave that way.

Whoever brought me here will have to take me home.

 

This poetry.  I never know what I’m going to say.

I don’t plan it.

When I’m outside the saying of it,

I get very quiet and rarely speak at all.

Rumi

(Coleman Barks translation)


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