CONFEDERATE LIVES DO MATTER–ALL LIVES MATTER!

vandalismB9318288941Z.1_20150731195350_000_G8IBGM7OO.1-0

I have stated this before: The bastards who used the tragic shooting in South Carolina for their totally irrelevant, anti-Southern agenda did nothing to heal the wounds inflicted in the Black community and Christian community in the American South–they just inflicted another wound! And the politicians who so easily pandered to these anti-Southern activists opened this new wound into a perpetually-bleeding gash!

EASY ON THE EYES #4

Abbe Lane 1Abbe Lane 2Alice WhiteAnn CorioBernadette Peters 1Bernadette Peters 2Bernadette Peters 3Bernadette Peters 4Betty Garrett 1Betty Garrett 2Betty Garrett 3Betty Garrett 4Beverly Garland 1Beverly Garland 2Carol Vorderman 1Carol Vorderman 2Carol Vorderman 3Carol Vorderman 4Carol Vorderman 5Carol Vorderman 6Carol Vorderman 7Carol Vorderman 8Carol Vorderman 9Carol Vorderman 10Carol Vorderman 11Cyd Charisse 1Cyd Charisse 2Cyd Charisse 3Cyd Charisse 4Cyd Charisse 5Cyd Charisse 6Cyd Charisse 7Cyd Charisse 8Cyd Charisse 9Cyd Charisse 10Cyd Charisse 11Cyd Charisse 12Cyd Charisse 13Cyd Charisse 14Cyd Charisse 15Diana BarrymoreDolores ReedDonna ReedElizabeth Allan 1Elizabeth Allan 2Elizabeth Taylor 1Elizabeth Taylor 2

No Merchandising. Editorial Use Only  Mandatory Credit: Photo by Rex Features ( 138664T )  ELIZABETH TAYLOR IN "LOVE IS BETTER THEN EVER" 1951  VARIOUS

No Merchandising. Editorial Use Only
Mandatory Credit: Photo by Rex Features ( 138664T )
ELIZABETH TAYLOR IN “LOVE IS BETTER THEN EVER” 1951
VARIOUS

Elizabeth Taylor 4Elizabeth Taylor 5Elizabeth Taylor 6Elizabeth Taylor 7Elizabeth Taylor 8Elizabeth Taylor 9Elizabeth Taylor 10

UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1970:  Photo of Elizabeth Taylor  Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

UNSPECIFIED – CIRCA 1970: Photo of Elizabeth Taylor Photo by Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Elizabeth Taylor (Liz Taylor) Directed by Richard Brooks

Elizabeth Taylor (Liz Taylor)
Directed by
Richard Brooks

Elizabeth Taylor 13

Cat On A Hot Tin Roof (1958) Directed by Richard Brooks Shown: Elizabeth Taylor

Cat On A Hot Tin Roof (1958)
Directed by Richard Brooks
Shown: Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor 15Elizabeth Taylor 16Elizabeth Taylor 17

***File Photo*** Elizabeth Taylor dies Hollywood icon {DAME ELIZABETH TAYLOR} has died at the age of 79. The actress, who was suffering from congestive heart failure, passed away in Los Angeles in the early hours of Wednesday morning (23Mar11) with her children by her side. Her son, Michael Wilding, confirmed the sad news and paid tribute to his late mother in a statement, which reads, "My mother was an extraordinary woman who lived life to the fullest, with great passion, humour, and love. Though her loss is devastating to those of us who held her so close and so dear, we will always be inspired by her enduring contribution to our world. "Her remarkable body of work in film, her ongoing success as a businesswoman, and her brave and relentless advocacy in the fight against HIV/AIDS, all make us all incredibly proud of what she accomplished. We know, quite simply, that the world is a better place for mom having lived in it. Her legacy will never fade, her spirit will always be with us, and her love will live forever in our hearts."  Elizabeth Taylor Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) Directed by Richard Brooks Supplied by WENN This is a PR photo. WENN does not claim any Copyright or License in the attached material. Fees charged by WENN are for WENN's services only, and do not, nor are they intended to, convey to the user any ownership of Copyright or License in the material. By publishing this material, the user expressly agrees to indemnify and to hold WENN harmless from any claims, demands, or causes of action arising out of or connected in any way with user's publication of the material.

***File Photo***
Elizabeth Taylor dies
Hollywood icon {DAME ELIZABETH TAYLOR} has died at the age of 79.
The actress, who was suffering from congestive heart failure, passed away in Los Angeles in the early hours of Wednesday morning (23Mar11) with her children by her side.
Her son, Michael Wilding, confirmed the sad news and paid tribute to his late mother in a statement, which reads, “My mother was an extraordinary woman who lived life to the fullest, with great passion, humour, and love. Though her loss is devastating to those of us who held her so close and so dear, we will always be inspired by her enduring contribution to our world.
“Her remarkable body of work in film, her ongoing success as a businesswoman, and her brave and relentless advocacy in the fight against HIV/AIDS, all make us all incredibly proud of what she accomplished. We know, quite simply, that the world is a better place for mom having lived in it. Her legacy will never fade, her spirit will always be with us, and her love will live forever in our hearts.”
Elizabeth Taylor
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)
Directed by Richard Brooks
Supplied by WENN
This is a PR photo. WENN does not claim any Copyright or License in the attached material. Fees charged by WENN are for WENN’s services only, and do not, nor are they intended to, convey to the user any ownership of Copyright or License in the material. By publishing this material, the user expressly agrees to indemnify and to hold WENN harmless from any claims, demands, or causes of action arising out of or connected in any way with user’s publication of the material.

Elizabeth Taylor 19Elizabeth Taylor 20Elizabeth Taylor 21Elizabeth Taylor 22Elizabeth Taylor 23Elizabeth Taylor 24Elizabeth Taylor 25Elizabeth Taylor 26Elizabeth Taylor 27Elizabeth Taylor 28Elizabeth Taylor 29Elizabeth Taylor 30Elizabeth Taylor 31Elizabeth Taylor 32Elizabeth Taylor 33Elizabeth Taylor 34Ella RainesEva Gabor 1Eva Gabor 2Eve MillerEvelyn Ankers 1Evelyn Ankers 2Evelyn West 1Evelyn West 2Evelyn West 3Evelyn West 4Evelyn West 5

Canadian born Fay Wray was brought up in Los Angeles and entered films at an early age. Fay was barely in her teens when she started working as an extra. Her early career has been described as working in "Oaters" as she was often cast as the silent heroine in Westerns at Universal. In 1926, the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers selected 13 young starlets whom they deemed most likely to succeed in pictures. Fay was chosen as one of these starlets along with Janet Gaynor and Mary Astor. Fame would indeed come to Fay when she played another heroine in Stroheim's The Wedding March (1928). She would continue playing leads in a number of films such as the good-bad girl in Thunderbolt (1929). By the early 30's, she was at Paramount working with Gary Cooper and Jack Holt in a number of average films like Master of Men (1933). She also appeared in horror films such as Doctor X (1932) and The Vampire Bat (1933) and it is not known whether the Horror is script driven or work driven. Next Fay was told that she would work with a tall dark leading man, only to find that it was a gorilla. Perhaps no one in the history of pictures could scream more dramatically than Fay, and she really put on a show with King Kong (1933). Fay's character provided a combination of sex appeal, vulnerability and lung capacity as she was stalked by the giant beast all the way to the top of the Empire State Building. But that was as far as Fay would rise as this was, after all, just another horror-type movie. After the King, she began a slow decline that put her into low-budget action films by the mid 30's. In 1939, her marriage to Saunders would end in divorce and her career would be almost finished. In 1942, Fay remarried and retired from the screen, forever to be remembered as the girl in 'King Kong'. However, in 1953 she made a comeback, playing mature character roles and also appeared on television as Catherine, Natalie Wood's mother in "The Pride of the Family" (1953).

Canadian born Fay Wray was brought up in Los Angeles and entered films at an early age. Fay was barely in her teens when she started working as an extra. Her early career has been described as working in “Oaters” as she was often cast as the silent heroine in Westerns at Universal. In 1926, the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers selected 13 young starlets whom they deemed most likely to succeed in pictures. Fay was chosen as one of these starlets along with Janet Gaynor and Mary Astor. Fame would indeed come to Fay when she played another heroine in Stroheim’s The Wedding March (1928). She would continue playing leads in a number of films such as the good-bad girl in Thunderbolt (1929). By the early 30’s, she was at Paramount working with Gary Cooper and Jack Holt in a number of average films like Master of Men (1933). She also appeared in horror films such as Doctor X (1932) and The Vampire Bat (1933) and it is not known whether the Horror is script driven or work driven. Next Fay was told that she would work with a tall dark leading man, only to find that it was a gorilla. Perhaps no one in the history of pictures could scream more dramatically than Fay, and she really put on a show with King Kong (1933). Fay’s character provided a combination of sex appeal, vulnerability and lung capacity as she was stalked by the giant beast all the way to the top of the Empire State Building. But that was as far as Fay would rise as this was, after all, just another horror-type movie. After the King, she began a slow decline that put her into low-budget action films by the mid 30’s. In 1939, her marriage to Saunders would end in divorce and her career would be almost finished. In 1942, Fay remarried and retired from the screen, forever to be remembered as the girl in ‘King Kong’. However, in 1953 she made a comeback, playing mature character roles and also appeared on television as Catherine, Natalie Wood’s mother in “The Pride of the Family” (1953).

Frances FarmerFrancine YorkGloria Grahame 1Gloria Grahame 2Gloria Grahame 3Gloria Grahame 4Gloria Grahame 5Gloria Grahame 6Gloria Grahame 7Gloria Grahame 8Gloria Grahame 9Gloria Grahame 10Gloria Grahame 11

Gloria grahame-1955

Gloria grahame-1955

Gloria Grahame 13Gloria Grahame 14Gloria Grahame 15Gloria Grahame 16

Gloria Grahame in state of undress in a scene from the film 'Naked Alibi', 1954. (Photo by Universal/Getty Images)

Gloria Grahame in state of undress in a scene from the film ‘Naked Alibi’, 1954. (Photo by Universal/Getty Images)

Gloria Grahame 18Gloria Grahame 19Gloria Grahame 20

English actress Helen Mirren, circa 1970. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

English actress Helen Mirren, circa 1970. (Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images)

Helen Mirren 2identity unknown 1identity unknown 2identity unknown 3Inga SwensonJane Greer 1Jane Greer 2Jane Greer 3Jean ByronJeanne Cooper 1Jeanne Cooper 2Jo Van FleetKathryn Grayson 1Kathryn Grayson 2Kathryn Grayson 3Kathryn Grayson 4Kathryn Grayson 5Kelly Anne BurnsLacey Chabert 1

Lacey Chabert at Jeff Vespa Photoshoot

Lacey Chabert at Jeff Vespa Photoshoot

Lacey Chabert 3Lacey Chabert 4Lacey Chabert 5Lilli Palmer 1Lilli Palmer 2Linda MarshLori Alan 1Lori Alan 2Margaret LeightonMargaret LindsayMargaret LockwoodMargaret MiddletonMarion BendaMarion Ross 1Marion Ross 2Merle Oberon 1Merle Oberon 2Merle Oberon 3Merle Oberon 4Mona Maris 1Mona Maris 2Nanette Fabray 1Nanette Fabray 2Nanette Fabray 3Nicola Bryant 1Nicola Bryant 2Nicola Bryant 3Nicola Bryant 4Noel Neill 1Noel Neill 2Noel Neill 3Noel Neill 4Noel Neill 5Noreen Nash 1Noreen Nash 2Noreen Nash 3Noreen Nash 4Olive Borden 1Olive Borden 2Olivia d'AboPamela BrownPhyllis Coates 1Phyllis Coates 2Phyllis Coates 3Phyllis Coates 4Phyllis Coates 5Pier Angeli 1Pier Angeli 2Pier Angeli 3Polly BergenSigne HassoSue Randall 1Sue Randall 2Sue Randall 3Tina Louise 1Tina Louise 2Tina Louise 3Tina Louise 4Tina Louise 5Tina Louise 6Tina Louise 7Tina Louise 8Val ValentineVirginia GreyViveca LindforsWendy Hiller 1Wendy Hiller 2Wendy Hiller 3

by Vivienne, chlorobromide print, 1950s

by Vivienne, chlorobromide print, 1950s

Yvonne Craig 1Yvonne Craig 2Yvonne Craig 3Yvonne Craig 4Yvonne Craig 5Yvonne Craig 6Yvonne Craig 7Yvonne Craig 8Yvonne Craig 9Yvonne Craig 10Yvonne Craig 11Yvonne Craig 12Yvonne Craig 13Yvonne Craig 14Yvonne Craig 15Yvonne De Carlo 1Yvonne De Carlo 2Yvonne De Carlo 3Yvonne De Carlo 4Yvonne De Carlo 5Yvonne De Carlo 6Yvonne De Carlo 7Yvonne De Carlo 8Yvonne De Carlo 9Yvonne De Carlo 10Yvonne De Carlo 11Zorita

A CROSS I WEAR AGAINST CENSORSHIP

Scott Mayo--1st Confederate Flag shirtScott Mayo--1st Confederate Flag shirt 2

Elsewhere in the South, it might be the Southern Cross–but here it’s the Stars and Bars (the First Confederate Flag) that has been censored, along with history itself.  And no good has ever come of government censorship–at the national, state, or local level.  My letter-to-the-editor, transcribed in this post, was finally published in the Pensacola News Journal Monday, July 27.

ABANDONED

My parents are still alive, yet in their old age they have become more indifferent toward me than ever before.  They’ve always been somewhat indifferent toward me–especially since I began developing a mind of my own in my twenties.  And my two sisters are also getting more indifferent toward me than ever before.  And all four of these–the only living members of my immediate family–are getting more and more irritable, impatient, and downright irrational–so that I can no longer talk with them about anything without their lashing out at me.

And I need my parents and my sisters–emotionally–more now than ever before. Their indifference toward me is painful beyond words.  They never call me on the phone, at all–just to see how I’m doing, just to see if I’m even alive.  If I were to die in this house today, they would never know it–not for a very long time.  And they don’t love me–they never really have.  Because love is unconditional–and neither of my parents, and neither of my sisters, have ever given me unconditional love.

If my parents and my sisters would die, it would be far less painful for me. I would grieve, I might even have to be hospitalized for a while.  But I could then recover, and get on with what’s left of my life.  Instead, they all die slowly, as I seem to be.  And this is far worse.

My parents and my sisters–they’ve hardly ever been there for me, emotionally. But now they’re never here for me, emotionally, at all.  They are not dead, but it’s as if they were, regarding me.

Why can’t we all die–just get it over with?  Instead of living on, when life is no longer worth the agony?  Why can’t this world just end, instead of slowly dying as it is?

This time is hell.  It’s just hell.  It’s worse than any end-of-the-world scenario presented in any sacred texts of any faith.

God help us–God help us all.

EASY ON THE EYES #3

Aileen QuinnAnn SothernAnne NagelArlene DahlBarbara BatesBarbara ParkinsBarbara ShelleyBessie Love 1Bessie Love 2Bessie Love 3Bessie Love 4Billie Dove 1

Billie Dove c. 1915-1918.  Restored by Nick and jane for Dr. Macro's High Quality Movie Scans website: http://www.doctormacro.com/index.html. Enjoy!

Billie Dove c. 1915-1918. Restored by Nick and jane for Dr. Macro’s High Quality Movie Scans website: http://www.doctormacro.com/index.html. Enjoy!

Brenda Leecaptioned as Glynis JohnsCarol LawrenceCarrie FisherColeen GrayCorine RottschaferDana WynterDolores del RioEdie AdamsElizabeth Logue 1Elizabeth Logue 2Evelyn Keyes

12 Nov 1954 --- Original caption: Eydie Gorme, Young vocalist on Steve Allen's Tonight show on NBC-TV, sings in many moods--- from blues to ballads, from carols to jazz. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

12 Nov 1954 — Original caption: Eydie Gorme, Young vocalist on Steve Allen’s Tonight show on NBC-TV, sings in many moods— from blues to ballads, from carols to jazz. — Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Frances LangfordGabriela Spanic 1Gabriela Spanic 2

1940's publicity photo of a young Gail Russell

1940’s publicity photo of a young Gail Russell

ca. 1960s, New York City, New York, USA --- Actress Gayle Hunnicutt seated and wearing short white cotton organdy pinafore dress with several layers of ruffles around hemline and forming the sleeves, and tying into a bow in back; designed by Oscar de la Renta; huge angular earrings by Michael Hic; coiffure by Maury of Kenneth. --- Image by © Condé Nast Archive/Corbis

ca. 1960s, New York City, New York, USA — Actress Gayle Hunnicutt seated and wearing short white cotton organdy pinafore dress with several layers of ruffles around hemline and forming the sleeves, and tying into a bow in back; designed by Oscar de la Renta; huge angular earrings by Michael Hic; coiffure by Maury of Kenneth. — Image by © Condé Nast Archive/Corbis

Gina LollobrigidaGladys BlakeGloria GordonGlynis Johns

UNITED STATES - CIRCA 1942:  Varga Girls from "Dubarry was a Lady.": Hazel Brooks during the actual shooting of calendar sequence.  (Photo by Peter Stackpole/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

UNITED STATES – CIRCA 1942: Varga Girls from “Dubarry was a Lady.”: Hazel Brooks during the actual shooting of calendar sequence. (Photo by Peter Stackpole/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Hazel Court 1Hazel Court 2Irene DunneIrish McCallaJean ParkerJean Simmons 1Jean Simmons 2Joan BlackmanJoan BlondellJoan TetzelJosie LorenJoyce BulifantKatherine DeMilleKim CattrallKim HunterKinuyo TanakaLeatrice JoyLinda DarnellLisa MontellLouise LathamLudmilla TcherinaMara Corday 1Mara Corday 2Mara Corday 3Mara Corday 4Mara Corday 5Mara Corday 6Mara Corday 7Marguerite ChapmanMary Ellen KayMary MurphyMona Freeman 1Mona Freeman 2Myrna Fahey 1Myrna Fahey 2Myrna Fahey 3Myrna Hansen 1Myrna Hansen 2Nancy CrawfordNancy GatesNancy KellyNancy MarlowNancy ScottPat Woodell 1Pat Woodell 2Pat Woodell 3Patricia MedinaPhyllis KirkRhonda FlemingRita JohnsonRuth GordonSamantha EggarSara ShaneSylvia SidneyVikki Dougan 1Vikki Dougan 2Vikki Dougan 3Vikki Dougan 4Vikki Dougan 5Virginia Leith

WHEN ARE YOU FROM?

As globalization intensifies, and as we live exist longer, the introductory question changes from where we are from to when.

EASY ON THE EYES #2

Margie StewartAnne GwynneAnnelle HayesAsa AkiraAudrey DaltonCarmen PhillipsCarolyn JonesCarolyn MartinCeleste HolmChristine KaufmannDebra PagetDiana MuldaurDiane WebberElaine StewartGene TierneyHelen MackHitomi TanakaIrene KellyJane Poni AdamsJean PetersJeanette NolanJeanne CrainJoan TaylorJoan VohsJoanne DruJoey HeathertonKellie MartinKendra Anderson

ca. 1959 --- Actress Kim Parker --- Image by © John Springer Collection/CORBIS

ca. 1959 — Actress Kim Parker — Image by © John Springer Collection/CORBIS

Leigh SnowdenLisa GayeLita BaronLucille BremerMala PowersMargaret O'BrienMaria MuldaurMarie LaforetMartha HyerMartine CarolMichelle DockeryRita Rudner

Rosalind Russell-1936

Rosalind Russell-1936

Sandra KnightShirley Anne FieldShirley JonesTeala LoringTricia CollinsYvonne de Carlo

EASY ON THE EYES

Adrienne AmesAlice JoyceAnn RutherfordBarbara LawrenceCarol HughesEleanor ParkerGianna Maria CanaleJean RogersJoanne ArnoldLezlie DaltonLori MarchMarla EnglishMaxine CooperPriscilla LawsonRita MorenoRosalba NeriRosina RevelleSheila RyanSilvana PampaniniStacy JorgensenStefania SandrelliSusan DamanteSusanne FlonVinessa ShawCan’t write much, with this eye pain–but I can upload pictures of beautiful women like these.  And looking at them–it really is easy on my eyes.

JUST WRITE SOMETHING ELSE

It’s hell being me–but especially in the last five years.  2010 was the year things started really deteriorating in my life.  But also in the world around me. This atypical weather, for example–it seems to have begun five years ago. I’ve been thinking that all this time–and I watched a report on the drought in California on PBS recently.  And a rancher there said the drought had been going on for five years.  That was the first time I’d heard anyone else coordinate the timing of this atypical weather with my estimation.

There is so much I’d like to write in this public journal.  Yet my eyes begin stinging as soon as I begin–and I have to stop when the pain gets unbearable.

Like now.

THE ELEPHANTS IN THE LIVING ROOM: THE SECOND

The second elephant in the living room of America is, of course, this mass hysteria over the Confederate Flag.  Yesterday was the first day I saw anything in any newspaper (the New York Times, in this case) about the only political issue relevant to the mass murder in South Carolina–that of gun ownership/gun control.  Specifically, the article gave some details of how the murderer was able to so easily obtain the weapon he used.

This should have been the focus of the press to begin with.  And because it wasn’t–it is now more difficult to obtain a Confederate flag than a handgun.  So bastards like Dylann Roof can continue killing, just as easily–while the American people can rest comfortably in the fact that they don’t have to look at any more Confederate flags.  Really reassuring isn’t it?

As aforementioned, most of the state and local politicians who removed Confederate flags all over the South were Republicans.  At first, I assumed this was just because these bastards wanted to assure reelection in 2016–and especially a Republican win for the White House.  But was it something more?  It has been suggested to me that these Republicans jumped onto the Confederate flag controversy to divert America’s attention away from the gun ownership/gun control issue.  And that’s highly possible–if not probable.

But let me be fair–the bastards who so vehemently demanded that these politicians remove Confederate flags all over the South were definitely Democrats. Leftist Democrats with a totally self-serving agenda.  Most of them were White anti-Southern activists from outside the South.  And I strongly suspect that many of them–if not most–were agents of the A.C.L.U. (the so-called American Civil Liberties Union).  And if you know anything about the A.C.L.U., you know that it is totally self-serving.  It thrives on power–pretending to represent its clients, while actually just manipulating and exploiting them.

I’ve mentioned before that the Republican Party is totally self-serving–and that the Democratic Party is totally self-serving.  And I am certain of this.  But there are many groups in this country that are as self-serving as these two political parties–groups that don’t want to destroy America, but to control it.  White supremacist groups, Black supremacist groups, anarchist groups, radical feminist groups, “gay rights” groups, militant nationalist groups, and anti-religious groups are just a few of these.

These groups (or this group) that swooped into the South immediately after this mass shooting, and used it as leverage for their totally irrelevant agenda, have been around a very long time–like the kinds of groups mentioned above.  These are people who hate the South, largely because they know nothing about it.  They are driven by regional prejudice–stereotyping all Southerners as the same.  In short, they are bigots.  And there’s nothing new about them.

What’s new is this mass pacification of such a group by state and local politicians. And this is what is so dangerous.  Like all “control groups”–this group (or these groups) will not stop with the Confederate Flag.  They will move on to demanding the destruction of all other remnants of the Confederacy–public or private–including Confederate cemeteries.  Give ’em an inch, they’ll take a mile.  Just like the White supremacist groups, Black supremacist groups, anarchist groups, radical feminist groups, “gay rights” groups, militant nationalist groups, anti-religious groups, and all other such “control groups” whose agenda is just that–to control the United States, to make it bow to their every whim.

My point is this: The biggest threat to our country is within our country–not without.  We can worry ourselves about the ISIS threat, the Russia threat, the potential Iran threat, even the illegal immigration threat–yet completely overlook the threat to our country by self-serving “control groups”, political parties, all kinds of groups that–by gaining control of America–can destroy America.

If our military guards our country against outside threats–yet our political leaders as well as we ourselves don’t guard our country against inside threats–our country will still be destroyed.


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