DIGITAL-AGE DILEMMAS

I saw something about that bizarre shooting in Virginia yesterday on AOL, but paid little attention to it–AOL thrives on sensationalism.  Then last night, watching the local news for the weather forecast I saw the ABC News version of the story. After seeing that, I was more curious of course, so I searched for actual video that they didn’t show in the news report. And I saw the video–several people had put it on YouTube.  It didn’t really show much–I could see why that local anchorwoman in Virginia couldn’t tell what exactly was going on just from the station video.  But with the background information, I saw enough.  And my curiosity was satisfied.

Then I saw links to videos about the whole incident being a possible hoax. I was curious, of course, and took a look at them.  These were YouTube videos allegedly of the actual video that the killer recorded.

The bottom line:  The video unintentionally broadcast by the Virginia news station looked quite real.  But the video allegedly posted by the killer looked quite fake. Those who had uploaded what they considered a hoax pointed out several problems with the killer’s video.  I could see their points–but the most obvious problem, to me, was this:  The killer walked up to the reporter, the woman being interviewed, and the cameraman, and stood just a few feet away from them. Then he looked around a while–and no one noticed him at all until he pulled out his gun and began firing. It just seemed so odd that they didn’t notice him–especially since they knew him.

Finally today (Thursday), I read the whole story in the New York Times and watched the whole story on the PBS NewsHour.  I found, from these, that the original video the killer posted on social media was deleted very soon after.  So it occurred to me then that the videos posted on YouTube could be tampered with, to make it look like a hoax.  But why would so many people bother to do that?

On the other hand, why would a television news station concoct a hoax of such magnitude, knowing full well that it would not be able to keep its secret?

I believe this incident really happened–but I’m confused by the YouTube videos posted allegedly of the killer’s video.  If these are not tampered with, I still have unanswered questions–mainly how the reporter, the cameraman, and the woman being interviewed didn’t notice the killer so close to them.

Should people have uploaded the news station’s video onto YouTube?  Should people have uploaded the killer’s alleged video to point out that it could have been a hoax?

Should I have watched the station’s video?  Should I then have watched the videos questioning the killer’s video as a hoax?

Should I even post this–a post about something so controversial?

Dilemmas.  Digital-Age dilemmas.

I hate the Digital Age.

EASY ON THE EYES #11

Dorothy Dandridge 1Dorothy Dandridge 2Dorothy Dandridge 3Dorothy DavisDorothy Dwan 1Dorothy Dwan 2Dorothy Dwan 3Dorothy RevierDorothy Sebastian 1Dorothy Sebastian 2Fay WrayGloria GrahameGypsy Rose LeeJoan BlondellKitty Carlisle 1Kitty Carlisle 2Kitty Carlisle 3Kitty Carlisle 4Kitty Carlisle 5Kitty Carlisle 6Kitty Carlisle 7Laya RakiLilian Harvey 1Lilian Harvey 2Lillian Bond 1Lillian Bond 2Mae BuschMyrna LoyPat PatersonPatricia Roc 1Patricia Roc 2Patricia Roc 3Patricia Roc 4Patricia Roc 5Patricia Roc 6Patricia Roc 7Patricia Roc 8Patricia Roc 9Patricia Roc 10Patricia Roc 11Patricia Roc 12Patricia Roc 13Patricia Roc 14Patricia Roc 15Patricia Roc 16

04 Feb 1946, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA --- Original caption: 2/4/1946- Hollywood, CA- Lovely English actress Patricia Roc, first "Lend-Lease" film player to come to this country for a role in Universal's "Canyon Passage", poses her first cheesecake art. --- Image by © Corbis

04 Feb 1946, Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA — Original caption: 2/4/1946- Hollywood, CA- Lovely English actress Patricia Roc, first “Lend-Lease” film player to come to this country for a role in Universal’s “Canyon Passage”, poses her first cheesecake art. — Image by © Corbis

Patricia Roc 18Patricia Roc 19Patricia Roc 20

by Ted Reed, bromide print, 1947

by Ted Reed, bromide print, 1947

Patricia Roc 22Patricia Roc 23Patricia Roc 24Patricia Roc 25Patricia Roc 26Patricia Roc 27Patricia Roc 28Peggy Cummins 1Peggy Cummins 2Polly Ann YoungPolly WaltersSherry Britton 1Sherry Britton 2Tempest StormVeronica Lake

A THOUGHT FOR MY PENNIES

If the love of money is the root of all evil, why isn’t the lack of money the root of all good?

THE ONLY WAY TO DESTROY ISIS

I don’t like to call it the “Islamic State” because it is neither Islamic nor a state. It is a totally self-serving organization whose only objectives are subjugation and destruction.

It is also the first terrorist organization to feed almost exclusively on Digital-Age technology–drawing its recruits from all over the world via the Internet.  And the only way to destroy ISIS is to completely cut off its access to the Internet–even if that means shutting down the Internet worldwide.

EASY ON THE EYES #10

Arlene DahlAva Gardner 1Ava Gardner 2Ava Gardner 3Ava Gardner 4Ava Gardner 5Barbara StanwyckBetty Amann 1Betty Amann 2

De Duitse filmster Betty Amann in de film "Asphalt", geregisseerd door Erich Pommer voor de UFA, waarin zij een "Vamp" speelt. Geretoucheerde foto met ingetekende fotolijst. [1932].

De Duitse filmster Betty Amann in de film “Asphalt”, geregisseerd door Erich Pommer voor de UFA, waarin zij een “Vamp” speelt. Geretoucheerde foto met ingetekende fotolijst. [1932].

Betty Amann 4Billie BurkeClaire WindsorCorinne Griffith 1Corinne Griffith 2Corinne Griffith 3Corinne Griffith 4Corinne Griffith 5Corinne Griffith 6Corinne Griffith 7Corinne Griffith 8Doris Eaton TravisFay WrayHedda HopperHelen Wareidentity unknown 1identity unknown 2identity unknown 3identity unknown 4identity unknown 5identity unknown 6identity unknown 7identity unknown 8Jeanette MacDonaldLotte LorringMarion ShillingNancy KwanNorma Shearer 1Norma Shearer 2Olive ThomasPeggy Shannonpossibly Ava GardnerSue Carol 1Sue Carol 2Sue Carol 3Sue Carol 4Sue Carol 5Sue Carol 6Sue Carol 7Sue Carol 8Sue Carol 9

1928, Probably California, USA --- Actresses at Mary Pickford's Tea Party --- Image by © John Springer Collection/CORBIS

1928, Probably California, USA — Actresses at Mary Pickford’s Tea Party — Image by © John Springer Collection/CORBIS

Sue Carol, et al 2Susan HaywardTallulah BankheadVera MilesVirginia Valli

EASY ON THE EYES #9

Ann Dvorak 1Ann Dvorak 2Ann Dvorak 3Ann Dvorak 4Ann Dvorak 5Ann Dvorak 6Ann Dvorak 7Ann Dvorak 8

Ann MillerAnn MillerAnn Miller

Ann MillerAnn MillerAnn Miller

Anna Neagle 1Anna Neagle 2Audrey HepburnAva GardnerBarbara Stanwyck 1Barbara Stanwyck 2Barbara Stanwyck 3Barbara Stanwyck 4Barbara Stanwyck 5Barbara Stanwyck 6Barbara Stanwyck 7Barbara Stanwyck 8Barbara Stanwyck 9Barbara Stanwyck 10Barbara Stanwyck 11Barbara Stanwyck 12Barbara Stanwyck 13Barbara Stanwyck 14Barbara Stanwyck 15

Barbara Stanwyck. Restored by jane for Dr. Macro's High Quality Movie Scans Website: http://www.doctormacro.com/. Enjoy!

Barbara Stanwyck. Restored by jane for Dr. Macro’s High Quality Movie Scans Website: http://www.doctormacro.com/. Enjoy!

Barbara Stanwyck 17Barbara Stanwyck 18Barbara Stanwyck 19Barbara Stanwyck 20Barbara Stanwyck 21Barbara Stanwyck 22Barbara Stanwyck 23Barbara Stanwyck 24Barbara Stanwyck 25Barbara Stanwyck 26Barbara Stanwyck 27Barbara Stanwyck 28Barbara Stanwyck 29Barbara Stanwyck 30Barbara Stanwyck 31Barbara Stanwyck 32Barbara Stanwyck 33Barbara Stanwyck 34Barbara Stanwyck 35Barbara Stanwyck 36Barbara Stanwyck 37

Ten Cents a Dance (1931) Directed by Lionel Barrymore Shown: Barbara Stanwyck

Ten Cents a Dance (1931)
Directed by Lionel Barrymore
Shown: Barbara Stanwyck

Barbara Stanwyck 39Barbara Stanwyck 40Barbara Stanwyck 41Barbara Stanwyck 42

1942: American screen star Barbara Stanwyck (1907-1990) wearing a white belted robe in a publicity still for 'The Gay Sisters', directed by Irving Rapper. (Photo by John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images)

1942: American screen star Barbara Stanwyck (1907-1990) wearing a white belted robe in a publicity still for ‘The Gay Sisters’, directed by Irving Rapper. (Photo by John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images)

Barbara Stanwyck 44Barbara Stanwyck 45Barbara Stanwyck 46Barbara Stanwyck 47Barbara Stanwyck 48Barbara Stanwyck 49Barbara Stanwyck 50Barbara Stanwyck 51Barbara Stanwyck 52Barbara Stanwyck 53Barbara Stanwyck 54Barbara Stanwyck 55Barbara Stanwyck 56

1941: Barbara Stanwyck (1907 - 1990) as con artist Jean Harrington, posing as the wealthy Lady Eve Sidwich in the romantic comedy 'The Lady Eve', directed by Preston Sturges. (Photo via John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images)

1941: Barbara Stanwyck (1907 – 1990) as con artist Jean Harrington, posing as the wealthy Lady Eve Sidwich in the romantic comedy ‘The Lady Eve’, directed by Preston Sturges. (Photo via John Kobal Foundation/Getty Images)

Barbara Stanwyck 58Barbara Stanwyck 61Barbara Stanwyck 62Carole LandisClaudette Colbert 1Claudette Colbert 2Claudette Colbert 3Claudette Colbert 4Corinne GriffithCyd CharisseDeanna DurbinElizabeth TaylorGia Scalaidentity unknown 1identity unknown 2identity unknown 3identity unknown 4identity unknown 5identity unknown 6identity unknown 7identity unknown 8identity unknown 9Karen Morley 1Karen Morley 2Karen Morley 3Lauren LaneMerle OberonRenee Whitney

EPSON scanner image

EPSON scanner image

Ruth Chatterton 2Susan HaywardSylvia Syms 1Sylvia Syms 2Sylvia Syms 3Sylvia Syms 4Barbara Stanwyck 59Barbara Stanwyck 60

FROM THE 2013 BOOK OF QUESTIONS #29

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

You are leading 100 people whose lives are in danger, and you must pick one of two paths.  One will save 95 people but 5 will die; the other has an even chance of saving everyone, but if it fails everyone will die.  Which would you choose?

I would choose the path that had an even chance of saving everyone.

THE POWERS THAT BE DON’T DESERVE TO BE

THE POWERS THAT BE DON’T DESERVE TO BE THE POWERS THAT BE.

FROM THE 2013 BOOK OF QUESTIONS #28

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

Would you rather live in a country where people can get rich if they succeed in business but might wind up destitute if they fail, or in a place where there is little opportunity to achieve wealth but a strong social safety net in place?

I already live in a country where people can get rich if they succeed in business but might wind up destitute if they fail.  This is of no consequence to me–I have no interest in business.  Yet I wouldn’t rather live in a place where there is a strong social safety net in place.  Before answering this question, I looked up the definition of “social safety net”–and found that it didn’t mean what I was hoping it would mean.  I was hoping that “social safety net” meant help within one’s family and one’s community.  Instead, “social safety net” means governmental help. And I don’t want to receive any more governmental help than I have to. Because–generally speaking–you can trust your family and community more than you can trust your government.

FROM THEIR PERSPECTIVE

The following is an excerpt from a draft of a family history written by my father:

     Back to Great Grandpa Mark Mayo.  I’ve enclosed some information about his war years–the history of Grandpa Mark’s unit, Company “E”, the roster of the men, and a brief summary of their engagements.  In November of 1864, Company “E” had some men captured at Pine Barren, Florida (about 25 miles north of Pensacola), and they were held as prisoners of war until the war ended. Most of the 15th Cavalry Regiment’s engagements were in Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana but as stated in the record, Company “E” was detached for special assignments for months at a time throughout the war as cavalry support for other outfits or for scouting enemy units.  Enclosed is a newspaper article from the Mobile paper about the battle of Eliska, Alabama, which was the last battle Grandpa Mark was in.  On his pension form, he told about his last battle around Claiborne, Alabama, which took place at the community of Eliska. As the information I’ve enclosed states, about 400 regular Confederate cavalry troops of the 15th Cavalry Regiment were sent to Eliska to help the local militia and some local people repel what was thought to be not too large a force of Union troops heading their way.  Grandpa Mark’s and Uncle Frederick’s Company “E” was one of the companies that went.  They ran into from 4,000 to 6,500 of some of the best equipped troops in the Union Army under General Steele, who were commanded in the field by General Lucas.  The Confederate troops were completely defeated.  The local people up there call it Lucas’ Raid.  A few days later General Robert E. Lee surrendered to General U.S. Grant at Appomattox, which effectively ended the Civil War.  Grandpa Mark and his brother were barely able to get away from Eliska alive.  After the South surrendered, Grandpa Mark took the oath of allegiance to the United States of America at Milton, Florida as was required of all Confederate veterans.  I don’t know where his brother, Frederick, and the McCurdy brothers took their oath–maybe the same place.

     I might mention that after Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox, just a couple hours later there was one more great battle raging farther South, which would be the last major engagement of the Civil War.  It was at Blakely, Alabama–a town across the river from Mobile where Confederate troops were guarding the eastern approach to Mobile.  Sixteen thousand Union troops completely overwhelmed the Confederate troops at Blakely.  The Confederate troops at Blakely were made up of regulars, and many old men and young boys. Many of the Confederate troops drowned while trying to swim in the river to escape the overwhelming force of Union troops.

     After the Civil War, Grandpa Mark drove a stagecoach for a while.  In 1880 Grandpa Mark and Aunt Mercy Jane’s husband, my Great-Great Uncle Francis Marian McCurdy, went into the timber business together in Escambia County, Florida.  Great-Grandpa Mark had married Margaret Angeline Jernigan in 1867. Great-Grandma Angeline was born in Santa Rosa County in 1843.

What did the Confederate Flag mean to Confederate troops?  Same things the Union Flag meant to Union troops: home, security, and survival.

My great-great grandfather Mark Mayo, my great-great grandfather Francis Marian McCurdy, and my great-great-great uncle Frederick Mayo were Confederate soldiers in the War between the Confederate States of America and the United States of America.

Like most Confederate soldiers, these three young men were not a part of the slave-owning aristocracy that had supported secession from the United States–their families had no say in that.  And like most Confederate soldiers, these three young men did not fight in the interest of slavery–or even for the cause of states’ rights.  They simply fought to protect their homes and families from an overwhelmingly powerful, invading army.


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