Archive for June, 2014

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #39

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

To what organization do you feel the deepest sense of loyalty? 

I feel no sense of loyalty to any organization.

But I feel a deep sense of loyalty to many ideals and causes.

I don’t care who is right–I only care what is right.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #38

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

Do you believe that government services such as education, health care, and police protection should be equally good everywhere, or that wealthier communities should have better services because they pay more taxes?

I strongly believe that government services should be equally good everywhere.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #37

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

If you could legally sell your vote in the next presidential election by giving someone a signed blank ballot, would you?

Absolutely not!

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #36

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

Do you feel that laws are more frequently too strict or too lenient?

In this country, I feel that laws are more frequently too lenient.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #35

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

If a person with whom you were negotiating a lucrative business arrangement lost his temper and started insulting you, would you be likely to pull out of the deal?

Yes, I would.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #34

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

The President of the United States earns about $250,000 a year while the president of Ford earns some $2,000,000.  Do you believe these salaries are what they should be?

Because this book was published in 1991, these figures are somewhat outdated.

I did a little bit of Google searching to see what they are now.

According to one source, the U.S. President’s annual income has been $400,000 a year since 2001.

According to another source, the current president of Ford earns about $1,500,000 a year now because of the the last recession.

But don’t quote me on this–either figure could easily be incorrect.  (When searching the Internet for information, it is very important to compare sources as much as possible–don’t rely on just one website.)

Still, the actual amounts these two people earn are really not the subject of this question.

What Dr. Stock is really asking is this:

Should the President of the United States earn one-eighth the amount that the president of a U.S. corporation earns (or should the president of a U.S. corporation earn eight times as much as the President of the United States earns)?

Ideally, no.

Ideally, the President of the United States should earn far more, and the president of Ford (or any other U.S. corporation) should earn far less.

But idealism must always be balanced with realism.

While the job of a corporation’s president must be a lucrative one, the job of a country’s president must not be. 

The President of the United States is arguably the most powerful person on earth.  And this power is the main incentive for the President to do a good job. 

Yet look how dangerous this power, alone, is.  Think of all the U.S. Presidents, Democratic and Republican, who have abused this power over generations.

In fact, in my opinion, the last U.S. President not to abuse his power was Gerald Ford.  Every U.S. President since Jimmy Carter–including Barack Obama–has abused his power. 

Yet I digress.  While the main incentive for the president of a corporation to do a good job is money, the main incentive for the president of a country to do a good job is power.

So the annual earnings of a U.S. president should remain the same (adjusted to inflation of course).  Keep in mind also that the President of the United States gets free room and board, free healthcare (the best available), and many other perks the president of Ford (or any other U.S. corporation) does not get.

We should be far more concerned about what our senators and representatives in the U.S. Congress–both Democratic and Republican–earn.  For they have the power to actually raise their own salaries–and they continue to do so!  Furthermore, unlike the President, they have no term limits!

FOLLOWING THE FRIARS CLUB #8

Here’s another favorite of mine from The Friars Club Private Joke File:

A married man keeps telling his wife, “Honey, you have such a beautiful butt.”  And you know what?  He’s right.  His birthday is coming, so she decides to take a trip to the tattoo parlor and get the words “Beautiful Butt” tattooed on her ass.

She walks in and tells the tattoo artist that her husband thinks she has a beautiful butt.  He looks and says, “You do have a beautiful butt.”  She tells him she wants “Beautiful Butt” tattooed on her ass.

The artist says, “I can’t fit that on your ass, it takes up too much space.  But I tell you what, I will tattoo the letters BB, one on each cheek, and that can stand for Beautiful Butt.”

She agrees and gets it done.

On the man’s birthday she is waiting for him when he comes home from work, wearing only a robe.  She stands at the top of the stairs and when he opens the door she says, “Look, honey!”  She takes off the robe, bends over, and the man yells, “WHO THE FUCK IS BOB?”

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #33

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

Ambushed by guerillas, your military unit suffers heavy casualties and several of your men are captured.  To get vital information that would save the lives of those men, would you, if necessary, torture a captured enemy soldier?

No. 

Torture is never justified, under any circumstances.

But sometimes killing is.

There would be no time to spare–no time to negotiate, no time to try truth serum, nothing.

I would point a loaded handgun at the prisoner’s face.

And I would give him a choice:

If he would give me the information I needed, he would be freed as soon as my men were rescued.

If he would not give me the information I needed, he would be killed immediately.

Whatever choice he made, I would be obligated to keep my word.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #32

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

Should a sucker get an even break?

Yes, but not without a harsh lecture.

If a stranger tried to make a big bet with you about something you were absolutely certain about, would you try to dissuade  him or just take his money?

I would refuse his money, and give him a harsh lecture.

FROM THE BOQ: BUSINESS, POLITICS AND ETHICS #31

Another question from Gregory Stock’s book is this:

For a yearly rental fee of one-third of your car’s value, would you display billboard-like ads on its doors?

Hell no.


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