ANOTHER FREUDIAN SLIP

The vehicle in front of mine had two bumper stickers–one on the left, one on the right.

I read the one on the left, aloud:

“OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM VETERAN”

Not unusual, I’d seen those before.

Then I read the one on the right, aloud:

“GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM VICTIM”

No, that’s not what it read–I tried again:

“GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM VICTIM”

No, that’s not what it read!  I read it silently this time:

“GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM VETERAN”

Then I tried reading it aloud once more:

“GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM VICTIM”

I gave up.  But every time I remembered that bumper sticker, I had to remind myself that it read:

“GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM VETERAN”

And even now, when I read that line aloud, I have to force myself not to read:

“GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM VICTIM”

The subconscious mind knows far more than the conscious mind knows–almost infinitely more.

Most of the time, in one’s waking hours, the subconscious mind is subdued by the conscious mind.

But sometimes the subconscious mind refuses to be subdued, and it fiercely, persistently interrupts the conscious mind’s train of thought–as a Freudian slip.

Some Freudian slips reveal nothing of great importance.

Once, when I was in the fourth or fifth grade–and I had been absent from school that day–a classmate of mine laughingly told me about a Freudian slip the teacher had made.

It was social studies time.  And at some point in the lesson, the teacher– intending to say “Mexican bullfight”–said “Mexican bullfart” instead!

Of course, this Freudian slip revealed nothing of great importance–though it did amuse the class, as well as the teacher herself.

But because most Freudian slips reveal things of great importance, no Freudian slip should be dismissed without a thorough examination.

Many of these reveal things of great importance only on a personal level.

The Freudian slip I addressed in a previous post was one of these:

I meant to say to myself, “I’ll be so glad when this cold (weather) is over.”

Instead, I said to myself, “I’ll be so glad when this Digital Age is over.”

This revealed something of great importance only on a personal level–my intense hatred of Digital-Age technology, and my equally intense desire to see this Digital Age collapse under its own weight.

But the Freudian slip of today revealed nothing of great importance on a personal level–I wasn’t personally affected by the “Global War on Terrorism”.

No, I’m not a:

“GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM VICTIM”

But veterans of this “Global War on Terrorism” are.

And friends and family members of veterans of this “Global War on Terrorism” are.

And troops actively fighting and dying in this “Global War on Terrorism” are.

And friends and family members of troops actively fighting and dying in this “Global War on Terrorism” are.

And civilians suffering and dying in this “Global War on Terrorism” are.

And friends and family members of civilians suffering and dying in this “Global War on Terrorism” are.

It is of great importance that we all remember this.

It is of great importance that we all remember all of the victims of this “Global War on Terrorism”.

2 Responses to “ANOTHER FREUDIAN SLIP”


  1. 1 theduffboy February 13, 2016 at 7:57 pm

    So true, we are all victims of this nonspecific, but very real rhetorical war. Have you seen Good Kill? It’s a movie starring Ethan Hawke about a drone pilot. Very powerful.

  2. 2 solosocial February 14, 2016 at 2:00 am

    Thank you, Luis.

    I hadn’t heard of “Good Kill” before–but I’ve just looked it up on the IMDb, and it appears to be an excellent, poignant film.

    This “Global War on Terrorism” is nonspecific–and this is the biggest problem with it. It’s a war, in every sense of the word, but it is unlike any war ever waged or fought because it has no clear objectives, no rules of engagement, no specified enemies or allies, no strategy for winning the war, no definition of winning the war, and absolutely no plan for an end or resolution of the war–ever.

    And one of the primary reasons this war is so nonspecific is that it is based on a totally nonspecific word, “terrorism”.

    Just as “racism” is the most misapplied word in the United States today–“terrorism” is the most misapplied word in the world today.

    Every U.S. war since the Korean War has been an undeclared war. President Harry S. Truman began this practice of sending U.S. troops to fight a war without a formal declaration of war by the U.S. Congress. And this was bad enough.

    But President George W. Bush went further–by not only sending U.S. troops to fight a war without a formal declaration of war by the U.S. Congress, but sending these troops to fight a “war on terror”. This country had just been directly attacked, for the first time since 1941–but George W. Bush sent U.S. troops to fight an unnamed enemy. He should have sent troops to fight a “war on al-Qaeda in Afghanistan”, or a “war on the Taliban in Afghanistan”.

    But he sent troops to fight a “war on terror”.

    This was how George W. Bush was so easily able to send troops to fight in Iraq in 2003–when there was no clear and present danger posed by Iraq at all–and while the troops he had sent to fight an unnamed enemy in Afghanistan were still fighting. And it was by this reckless act–this total betrayal of the trust of the American people–that President George W. Bush caused the needless deaths of countless U.S. troops in both Afghanistan and Iraq, not to mention the needless deaths of countless civilians in both Afghanistan and Iraq.

    And President Barack Obama–by keeping U.S. troops in Afghanistan to continue fighting a nameless enemy indefinitely–is perpetuating this “war on terror” waged by George W. Bush.

    God knows what hell the next U.S. president–Republican or Democrat–will unleash in the name of this “war on terror”.


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