THEY ARE NOTHING TO BE AFRAID OF

When I was a little boy, I was afraid of cats.

I was terrified of cats, actually.

Domestic cats.

We had no cats, as pets—only dogs.

And whenever I saw a cat—anywhere near me—I got back inside, fast.  

Whenever I saw a cat, anywhere near me, I got into my safe space—and stayed there.

Mr. Sutton, over a block away from our house, had cats.

And even though our backyard was fenced, I would sit on our back porch, rather than even venture into our fenced backyard—because I was so terrified of those cats over a block away.

My mother would urge me to get off that back porch, and enjoy the backyard—but I wouldn’t budge, because I was so terrified of neighbors’ cats.

There was a National Geographic article about cats.

In that article, there was a photograph of a Siamese cat, standing up, grabbing a fish someone had offered it—and because it was a close-up photograph, that cat appeared to be the size of a man or woman.

I had a nightmare about that cat.  I dreamed there was a man-or-woman-sized Siamese cat walking upright down the hall, saying, “Ring around the collar, ring around the collar!” and coming to get me.

One night, I thought I saw a cat in the hall—even though we had no cats.  And to this day, I’m not sure if that cat was real or not.

Cats scared the hell out of me—I truly thought they were the most terrifying things in the world.

My mother said that a cat jumped on my back when I was an infant—and that’s why I was so terrified of cats.  I can’t remember this incident—but it had to have happened, because it’s the only thing that explains my fear of cats.

One night, I saw a cat outside in the dark—and ran back inside the house, my safe space, of course.

But my sister, Cathy, who had taught me how to ride a bicycle without training wheels—got rid of my fear right there.

She picked up the cat, and brought it inside the house.  And she showed me that the cat was nothing to be afraid of, and urged me to pet the cat.  

And I petted the cat, as Cathy held it—and discovered that it was nothing to fear at all.  I discovered that it was just like a dog—and was pretty and soft and warm and friendly, just like a dog—and that it liked to be petted, and made a pleasant, purring sound.

Once my sister, Cathy, urged me not to run from a cat—but to learn something about it, and to gain some understanding of it—I was completely cured of my fear of cats.

And I have never been afraid of cats—at all—since that moment.

You hate Confederate flags and monuments, because you are afraid of them.

And you are afraid of Confederate flags and monuments, because you have learned nothing about them, and have gained no understanding of them.

But rather than face your fear of Confederate flags and monuments—and allow yourself to learn about them, and gain some understanding of them—you demand that politicians remove them from your sight.

And the gutless and immoral Republican and Democratic politicians remove them from your sight—and you remain terrified of all Confederate flags and monuments.

The gutless and immoral neocon and liberal politicians remove them from your sight—and you remain terrified of all Confederate flags and monuments.

But this time, I’m asking you not to run from Confederate flags and monuments.

I’m asking you not to retreat to your safe spaces—where you’re never really safe, because the only thing you have to fear truly is fear itself.

I get rid of your fear right now.

I show you the Confederate flags and monuments—in this space.  And I show you that Confederate flags and monuments are nothing to be afraid of, and urge you to look at the flags and monuments.

I urge you not to let politicians censor your Confederate flags and monuments anymore—but to learn something about them, and to gain some understanding of them—so you’ll be completely cured of your fear of Confederate flags and monuments.

Look at these flags and monuments.  Look at them, and think about what they really meant, in the time that they were created.  Since June 22, 2015, this blog has been filled with background information on Confederate flags and monuments—not misinformation, like that spread by neocon and liberal politicians, like Nimrata Randhawa Haley and Mitch Landrieu—but real, researched, truthful information that will give you a good place to start in your discovery of the true history of Confederate flags and monuments.

Your fear of Confederate flags and monuments is as irrational as my fear of cats was—and you can rid yourself of that irrational fear right now, if you truly make an effort to do so.

Are you ready?

You see, they are nothing to be afraid of—only something to be discovered, understood, and even appreciated.

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