A CIVICS LESSON

Look at this flag.

This is a historical flag that represents the Confederate States of America—a historical nation in the history of the United States of America.

This flag is in a public space.

That means this flag belongs to the public.

The public is the people.

You are the people—and public officials, elected or appointed, have no right to censor this flag without your consent.

To do so is to violate your First-Amendment right to freedom of speech.

This flag belongs to you—no public official has the right to censor it without your consent.

It doesn’t matter how you feel about the historical Confederate States of America.

It only matters that this flag belongs to you—the people.

And no public official, elected or appointed, has any right to censor it without your consent.

Look at this flag.

This is a historical flag that represents the Confederate States of America—a historical nation in the history of the United States of America.

This flag is in a public space.

That means this flag belongs to the public.

The public is the people.

You are the people—and public officials, elected or appointed, have no right to censor this flag without your consent.

To do so is to violate your First-Amendment right to freedom of speech.

This flag belongs to you—no public official has the right to censor it without your consent.

It doesn’t matter how you feel about the historical Confederate States of America.

It only matters that this flag belongs to you—the people.

And no public official, elected or appointed, has any right to censor it without your consent.

Look at this flag.

This is a historical flag that represents the Confederate States of America—a historical nation in the history of the United States of America.

This flag is in a public space.

That means this flag belongs to the public.

The public is the people.

You are the people—and public officials, elected or appointed, have no right to censor this flag without your consent.

To do so is to violate your First-Amendment right to freedom of speech.

This flag belongs to you—no public official has the right to censor it without your consent.

It doesn’t matter how you feel about the historical Confederate States of America.

It only matters that this flag belongs to you—the people.

And no public official, elected or appointed, has any right to censor it without your consent.

Look at this flag.

This is a historical flag that represents the Confederate States of America—a historical nation in the history of the United States of America.

This flag is in a public space.

That means this flag belongs to the public.

The public is the people.

You are the people—and public officials, elected or appointed, have no right to censor this flag without your consent.

To do so is to violate your First-Amendment right to freedom of speech.

This flag belongs to you—no public official has the right to censor it without your consent.

It doesn’t matter how you feel about the historical Confederate States of America.

It only matters that this flag belongs to you—the people.

And no public official, elected or appointed, has any right to censor it without your consent.

Look at this flag.

This is a historical flag that represents the Confederate States of America—a historical nation in the history of the United States of America.

This flag is in a public space.

That means this flag belongs to the public.

The public is the people.

You are the people—and public officials, elected or appointed, have no right to censor this flag without your consent.

To do so is to violate your First-Amendment right to freedom of speech.

This flag belongs to you—no public official has the right to censor it without your consent.

It doesn’t matter how you feel about the historical Confederate States of America.

It only matters that this flag belongs to you—the people.

And no public official, elected or appointed, has any right to censor it without your consent.

Look at this monument.

This is a historical monument that represents the Confederate States of America—a historical nation in the history of the United States of America.

This monument is in a public space.

That means this monument belongs to the public.

The public is the people.

You are the people—and public officials, elected or appointed, have no right to censor this monument without your consent.

To do so is to violate your First-Amendment right to freedom of speech.

This monument belongs to you—no public official has the right to censor it without your consent.

It doesn’t matter how you feel about the historical Confederate States of America.

It only matters that this monument belongs to you—the people.

And no public official, elected or appointed, has any right to censor it without your consent.

Look at this monument.

This is a historical monument that represents the Confederate States of America—a historical nation in the history of the United States of America.

This monument is in a public space.

That means this monument belongs to the public.

The public is the people.

You are the people—and public officials, elected or appointed, have no right to censor this monument without your consent.

To do so is to violate your First-Amendment right to freedom of speech.

This monument belongs to you—no public official has the right to censor it without your consent.

It doesn’t matter how you feel about the historical Confederate States of America.

It only matters that this monument belongs to you—the people.

And no public official, elected or appointed, has any right to censor it without your consent.

What happens when public officials censor the public’s historical flags and monuments without the public’s consent—directly or indirectly?

What happens when public officials censor the people’s historical flags and monuments without the people’s consent—directly or indirectly?

This is what happens:

“I know you’re a strong supporter of the Second Amendment–is there anything about this situation that makes you think, ‘Okay, should we rethink–is it time for some kind of change?'”
“ANY TIME THERE IS A TRAUMATIC SITUATION, PEOPLE WANT SOMETHING TO BLAME–THEY ALWAYS WANT SOMETHING TO GO AFTER…”

“THE HATE-FILLED MURDERER WHO MASSACRED OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS IN CHARLESTON [SOUTH CAROLINA] HAS A SICK AND TWISTED VIEW OF [THE CONFEDERATE FLAG THAT FLIES ON THE STATEHOUSE GROUNDS IN COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA]”
“TODAY WE ARE HERE…TO SAY IT’S TIME TO MOVE THE FLAG…”

“I UNDERSTAND THE [FIRST CONFEDERATE] FLAGS ARE DOWN, BUT I WANT TO MAKE IT PERMANENT. I DON’T WANT ANY CHANCE OF THOSE FLAGS GOING BACK UP.”

State workers take down a Confederate national flag on the grounds of the state Capitol, Wednesday, June 24, 2015, in Montgomery. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley orders Confederate flags taken down from state Capitol. (AP Photo/Martin Swant)

State workers take down a Confederate national flag on the grounds of the state Capitol, Wednesday, June 24, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley ordered Confederate flags taken down from a monument at the state Capitol. (AP Photo/Martin Swant)

Workers remove the statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee in Dallas, Texas, U.S., September 14, 2017. REUTERS/Rex Curry

The statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee is escorted after removal from its platform in Dallas, Texas, U.S., September 14, 2017. REUTERS/Rex Curry

Where are those flags and monuments?

Those were historical flags and monuments that represented the Confederate States of America—a historical nation in the history of the United States of America.

Those flags and monuments were in public spaces.

That meant those flags and monuments belonged to the public.

The public was the people.

You were the people—and public officials, elected or appointed, had no right to censor those flags or monuments without your consent.

To do so was to violate your First-Amendment right to freedom of speech.

Those flags and monuments belonged to you—no public official had the right to censor them without your consent.

It didn’t matter how you felt about the historical Confederate States of America.

It only mattered that those flags and monuments belonged to you—the people.

And no public official, elected or appointed, had any right to censor them without your consent.

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