Posts Tagged 'human rights'



A CATCHER IN THE RYE

“‘You know that song ‘If a body catch a body comin’ through the rye’?  I’d like—‘

“‘It’s ‘If a body meet a body coming through the rye’!’ old Phoebe said.  ‘It’s a poem.  By Robert Burns.’

“‘I know it’s a poem by Robert Burns.’

“She was right, though.  It is ‘If a body meet a body coming through the rye.’  I didn’t know it then, though.

“‘I thought it was ‘If a body catch a body,’ I said.  ‘Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all.  Thousands of little kids, and nobody’s around—nobody big, I mean—except me.  And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff.  What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff—I mean if they’re running and they don’t look where they’re going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them.  That’s all I’d do all day.  I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all.  I know it’s crazy, but that’s the only thing I’d really like to be.  I know it’s crazy.’

“Old Phoebe didn’t say anything for a long time.  Then, when she said something, all she said was, ‘Daddy’s going to kill you.’

“‘I don’t give a damn if he does,’ I said. . . .”

J. D. Salinger

The Catcher in the Rye

1945

YOUR RIGHTS END WHERE THE RIGHTS OF OTHERS BEGIN

Before this mindless Digital Age, there was no such thing as transgendered.  

There was such a thing as transsexual.

A transsexual person was someone who had gone to the trouble to have a sex change operation.

If someone believed he was supposed to be female—to such an extent that he had a sex change operation performed on himself—no one was going to argue with him (her).

If someone believed she was supposed to be male—to such an extent that she had a sex change operation performed on herself—no one was going to argue with her (him).

There seems to be a great deal of confusion about gender today.

Some languages have two genders—masculine and feminine.

Other languages have three genders—masculine, feminine, and neuter.

And some other languages have more than three genders.

Though sex is specifically a physical term, gender is not.

And the truth is that every human being has both masculine and feminine traits—in addition to neutral traits.

Every human being has both masculinity and femininity—as well as neutrality.

Most human males have more masculinity than femininity—most of the time—though there are exceptions.

Most human females have more femininity than masculinity—most of the time—though there are exceptions.

And though we should not favor the exceptions, we should not dismiss them either.  Sometimes they are the ones who accomplish the most—and contribute the most.

The case can be made that all of us are already transgendered—that in fact we transition between the masculine and feminine genders, as constantly, and naturally, as our heart rates and blood pressures fluctuate.

If sometimes you feel more feminine than masculine, whatever your sex, maybe you are.

If sometimes you feel more masculine than feminine, whatever your sex, maybe you are.

If you feel more like a woman than the man you are, however, that doesn’t make you a woman—though you have the right to feel that way.

If you feel more like a man than the woman you are, however, that doesn’t make you a man—though you have the right to feel that way.

If you feel more like a woman than the man you are, you even have the right to wear a woman’s clothes, and use a woman’s mannerisms—in the privacy of your residence, or in the appropriate public settings.

If you feel more like a man than the woman you are, you even have the right to wear a man’s clothes, and use a man’s mannerisms—in the privacy of your residence, or in the appropriate public settings.

If you are a man, however, you do not have the right to demand that everyone else see you as a woman—or treat you like a woman.

If you are a woman, however, you do not have the right to demand that everyone else see you as a man—or treat you like a man.

You have the right to indulge your fantasies—everyone has that right.

You do not have the right, however, to demand that everyone else indulge your fantasies—no one has that right.

Your rights end where the rights of others begin.

THEY ARE NOTHING TO BE AFRAID OF

When I was a little boy, I was afraid of cats.

I was terrified of cats, actually.

Domestic cats.

We had no cats, as pets—only dogs.

And whenever I saw a cat—anywhere near me—I got back inside, fast.  

Whenever I saw a cat, anywhere near me, I got into my safe space—and stayed there.

Mr. Sutton, over a block away from our house, had cats.

And even though our backyard was fenced, I would sit on our back porch, rather than even venture into our fenced backyard—because I was so terrified of those cats over a block away.

My mother would urge me to get off that back porch, and enjoy the backyard—but I wouldn’t budge, because I was so terrified of neighbors’ cats.

There was a National Geographic article about cats.

In that article, there was a photograph of a Siamese cat, standing up, grabbing a fish someone had offered it—and because it was a close-up photograph, that cat appeared to be the size of a man or woman.

I had a nightmare about that cat.  I dreamed there was a man-or-woman-sized Siamese cat walking upright down the hall, saying, “Ring around the collar, ring around the collar!” and coming to get me.

One night, I thought I saw a cat in the hall—even though we had no cats.  And to this day, I’m not sure if that cat was real or not.

Cats scared the hell out of me—I truly thought they were the most terrifying things in the world.

My mother said that a cat jumped on my back when I was an infant—and that’s why I was so terrified of cats.  I can’t remember this incident—but it had to have happened, because it’s the only thing that explains my fear of cats.

One night, I saw a cat outside in the dark—and ran back inside the house, my safe space, of course.

But my sister, Cathy, who had taught me how to ride a bicycle without training wheels—got rid of my fear right there.

She picked up the cat, and brought it inside the house.  And she showed me that the cat was nothing to be afraid of, and urged me to pet the cat.  

And I petted the cat, as Cathy held it—and discovered that it was nothing to fear at all.  I discovered that it was just like a dog—and was pretty and soft and warm and friendly, just like a dog—and that it liked to be petted, and made a pleasant, purring sound.

Once my sister, Cathy, urged me not to run from a cat—but to learn something about it, and to gain some understanding of it—I was completely cured of my fear of cats.

And I have never been afraid of cats—at all—since that moment.

You hate Confederate flags and monuments, because you are afraid of them.

And you are afraid of Confederate flags and monuments, because you have learned nothing about them, and have gained no understanding of them.

But rather than face your fear of Confederate flags and monuments—and allow yourself to learn about them, and gain some understanding of them—you demand that politicians remove them from your sight.

And the gutless and immoral Republican and Democratic politicians remove them from your sight—and you remain terrified of all Confederate flags and monuments.

The gutless and immoral neocon and liberal politicians remove them from your sight—and you remain terrified of all Confederate flags and monuments.

But this time, I’m asking you not to run from Confederate flags and monuments.

I’m asking you not to retreat to your safe spaces—where you’re never really safe, because the only thing you have to fear truly is fear itself.

I get rid of your fear right now.

I show you the Confederate flags and monuments—in this space.  And I show you that Confederate flags and monuments are nothing to be afraid of, and urge you to look at the flags and monuments.

I urge you not to let politicians censor your Confederate flags and monuments anymore—but to learn something about them, and to gain some understanding of them—so you’ll be completely cured of your fear of Confederate flags and monuments.

Look at these flags and monuments.  Look at them, and think about what they really meant, in the time that they were created.  Since June 22, 2015, this blog has been filled with background information on Confederate flags and monuments—not misinformation, like that spread by neocon and liberal politicians, like Nimrata Randhawa Haley and Mitch Landrieu—but real, researched, truthful information that will give you a good place to start in your discovery of the true history of Confederate flags and monuments.

Your fear of Confederate flags and monuments is as irrational as my fear of cats was—and you can rid yourself of that irrational fear right now, if you truly make an effort to do so.

Are you ready?

You see, they are nothing to be afraid of—only something to be discovered, understood, and even appreciated.

LET US BE CONSERVATIONISTS, RATHER THAN ENVIRONMENTALISTS

Earth Day is tomorrow.

Earth Day is a nice sentiment, but it is just as ineffective at bringing about real, positive change as Martin Luther King Jr. Day is.

Environmentalism is like communism—it always works in theory, but never works in practice.

Because environmentalism, just like communism, works against human nature.

Conservationism is like capitalism—it always works in theory, and always works in practice (if it is applied with knowledge, wisdom, discipline, and restraint).

Because conservationism, just like capitalism, works with human nature.

Environmentalism says, “Nature first—to hell with humanity.”

Conservationism says, “Humanity first—it is in the interest of humanity to conserve the earth’s natural resources for the benefit of humanity.”

On every day—not just Earth Day—let us be conservationists, rather than environmentalists.

RESPECT AND APPRECIATE, GENERATION Y

BLACK LIVES MATTER, Generation Y?

During the Great Depression, Marian Anderson was prohibited from singing at Constitution Hall, in Washington, D.C., by the Daughters of the American Revolution—because she was colored.  First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the DAR—then arranged for Marian Anderson to sing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, instead.

 

BLACK LIVES MATTER, Generation Y?

In 1940, Hattie McDaniel was a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award nominee for her role as “Mammy” in the 1939 production of “Gone with the Wind”.

Colored people were prohibited from entering the Los Angeles hotel where the awards ceremony was held, but the hotel made an exception for Hattie McDaniel.  It allowed her to attend the ceremony—though she had to sit at a table across the room from the tables where the whites sat.  Hattie McDaniel graciously accepted the Best Supporting Actress Academy Award however, stating that she hoped to be a credit to her race.

 

BLACK LIVES MATTER, Generation Y?

The majority of abolitionists in the 19th century were whites who simply didn’t want blacks around—enslaved or free.

In all Northern states, blacks were segregated from whites—and some, like Indiana, kept blacks out entirely.

 

BLACK LIVES MATTER, Generation Y?

My Grandma Mayo, who was raised in Ohio, encountered some uppity Southern women once—the kind of Southern women who gave all Southern women a bad name.  

They asked her a question about a train’s schedule, and she replied, “That colored lady said…”

“We don’t call a colored woman a ‘lady,'” they interrupted.

 

BLACK LIVES MATTER, Generation Y?

My Grandma Mayo also told me of a restaurant in New York that didn’t take kindly to recent desegregation laws.

The waitress served the black man and his wife—but in the rudest, noisiest manner.

She slammed their plates onto the table, and abruptly walked away.

 

BLACK LIVES MATTER, Generation Y?

My German friend, Mr. Vogel, wanted to register to vote in Alabama, after moving there from Wisconsin.

He was told he’d have to pay a poll tax to register to vote.

“Why?” he asked.

“To keep the niggers down,” was the reply.

Mr. Vogel refused to pay a poll tax for a reason like that—he waited until poll taxes were prohibited, before he registered to vote in Alabama.

 

You can put those BLACK LIVES MATTER signs down, Generation Y.  And you can show some appreciation for the fact that you’ve never truly suffered a day in your privileged lives.  And you can show some respect for your ancestors—and your elders—who have.

 

ME TOO, Generation Y?

My Grandma Mayo’s Aunt Pearl told of her mother—an orphan in Ohio.

At one point, Aunt Pearl’s mother, Lizzie, was staying with a woman who had three sons.  This woman’s three sons bullied Lizzie, a great deal—verbally and emotionally.

But whenever Lizzie reported this abuse to their mother, their mother accused Lizzie of lying—and sided with her sons, without ever even questioning them.

Eventually, Lizzie was adopted by a more understanding and loving foster mother.

 

ME TOO, Generation Y?

My Grandma Mayo was actually born in Nashville.

But her father died, not long after she was born.  

Her sixteen-year-old mother, Nonnie, had to take her newborn daughter all the way back home to Akron, Ohio—because she didn’t have the means to raise her by herself.

 

ME TOO, Generation Y?

Nonnie and Pearl had a sister named Polly.

I have a photograph of my Great-Great Aunt Polly that was taken shortly before she died—she was a beautiful young woman.

Polly died in childbirth—at age eighteen.

Needless to say, her husband was heartbroken.

 

ME TOO, Generation Y?

My Grandma Mayo was “pro-choice”, and I didn’t agree with her on that point.

But her opinion was completely understandable.

Louise—a beautiful cousin of her husband’s—got pregnant, out of wedlock.

In those days, an unwed woman who got pregnant was often treated like trash—while the man who impregnated her was often treated with impunity.

As was so often the case, in those days, the father of Louise’s unborn child disappeared—and Louise was faced with the stigma every abandoned, unwed mother faced.

Louise panicked, and attempted to abort the child.

She and her unborn child died in the attempt.

 

ME TOO, Generation Y?

During the War between the Confederate States and the United States—and especially during the “Reconstruction”, a brutal occupation in which the people of the vanquished Confederate States were denied their constitutional rights for twelve years—Southern women, black and white, were brutally raped by Union troops and Union League terrorists, on a constant basis.

 

ME TOO, Generation Y?

On March 25, 1911, 145 young women—mostly teenaged immigrants who didn’t speak English—burned to death at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory in New York City.

Women died in Northern factories often—this was just one of the worst of such tragedies.

In fact, the majority of factory workers in Northern U.S. cities were orphans and unwed women, in those days.

And the factory owners and managers—most of them Jewish men—couldn’t care less.

 

You can put those ME TOO signs down, Generation Y.  And you can show some appreciation for the fact that you’ve never truly suffered a day in your privileged lives.  And you can show some respect for your ancestors—and your elders—who have.

NOT A GOOD BET, IS IT?

Christians are at their worst on Sundays, and on Christian holidays.

At least in the United States, Christians are at their worst on Sundays, and during the Christmas holidays (Thanksgiving Day through New Year’s Day), and over Easter weekend (Good Friday through Easter Sunday).

It is on Sundays, and on Christian holidays, that Christians most belligerently refuse to follow Christ, in word or deed.

It is futile to ask Christians for any help on Sundays—they would rather let you die than help you.

It is futile to ask Christians for any help on Christian holidays—they will gladly let you die, rather than help you.

I am hungry right now—in fact, I am starving.

Because Christians will let me starve to death, rather than lift a finger to help me over Easter weekend.

Christians will let anyone starve to death, rather than lift a finger to help anyone over Easter weekend.

The reason is simple—Christians take their salvation for granted.

Christians believe that as long as they believe in Jesus Christ, as the Incarnation of God on earth, sacrificed on the Cross for the sins of humanity, they will go to Heaven when they die—no matter how sinful they are toward their fellow human beings.

This is how Christians justified the Crusades, the Inquisition, colonialism, and every other sin they committed yesterday.

And this is how Christians justify Zionism, this global war on Muslims, and every other sin they commit today.

Christians believe that as long as they believe in Jesus Christ, as the Incarnation of God on earth, sacrificed on the Cross for the sins of humanity, they will go to Heaven when they die—no matter how sinful they are toward their fellow human beings.

And they bet their eternity on this.

Not a good bet, is it?

REVELATIONS ABOUT THE REAL LINCOLN

Abraham Lincoln is the most mythologized of all U.S. presidents. The following editorial, by Syndicated Columnist Walter Williams, includes some surprising revelations about the real Lincoln.

Does Civil War need a new name?

“We call the war of 1861 the Civil War.  But is that right?  A civil war is a struggle between two or more entities trying to take over the central government. Confederate President Jefferson Davis no more sought to take over Washington, D.C., than George Washington sought to take over London in 1776.  Both wars, those of 1776 and 1861, were wars of independence.  Such a recognition does not require one to sanction the horrors of slavery.  We might ask: How much of the war was about slavery?

“Was President Abraham Lincoln really for outlawing slavery?  Let’s look at his words.  In an 1858 letter, Lincoln said, ‘I have declared a thousand times, and now repeat that, in my opinion neither the General Government, nor any other power outside of the slave states, can constitutionally or rightfully interfere with slaves or slavery where it already exists.’

“In a Springfield, Illinois, speech, he explained: ‘My declarations upon this subject of Negro slavery may be misrepresented but cannot be misunderstood.  I have said that I do not understand the Declaration (of Independence) to mean that all men were created equal in all respects.’

“What about Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation?  Here are his words: ‘I view the matter (of slaves’ emancipation) as a practical war measure, to be decided upon according to the advantages or disadvantages it may offer to the suppression of the rebellion.’  He also wrote: ‘I will concede that emancipation would help us in Europe, and convince them that we are incited by something more than ambition.’  When Lincoln first drafted the proclamation, war was going badly for the Union. London and Paris were considering recognizing the Confederacy and assisting it in its war against the Union.

“Lincoln did articulate a view of secession that would have been heartily endorsed by the Confederacy: ‘Any people anywhere, being inclined and having the power, have the right to rise up and shake off the existing government and form a new one that suits them better. … Nor is this right confined to cases in which the whole people of an existing government may choose to exercise it.  Any portion of such people can revolutionize and make their own of so much of the territory as they inhabit.’  Lincoln expressed that view in an 1848 speech in the U.S. House of Representatives, supporting the war with Mexico and the secession of Texas.

“Why didn’t Lincoln share the same feelings about Southern secession? Follow the money.  During the 1850s, tariffs amounted to 90 percent of federal revenue. Southern ports paid 75 percent of tariffs in 1859.  What ‘responsible’ politician would let that much revenue go?”

Let me add that Lincoln’s admission of the true motive behind his Emancipation Proclamation (as a “practical war measure”) was clearly demonstrated in its application. Lincoln is considered the Great Emancipator, but facts prove otherwise.  The most damning is this: Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation applied only to the Confederate States.  It did not apply to the Border States. The Border States were four slave states that had not seceded from the United States: Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland, and Delaware. Under the Emancipation Proclamation, slavery continued in the Border States.

Slavery was not abolished in the United States until the Thirteenth Amendment was ratified on December 6, 1865.

[This is a reposting of a September 6, 2015, post]

WHEN IS DR. KING’S DREAM GOING TO BE REALIZED?

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tomorrow is International Women’s Day—and this month is Women’s History Month.

Last month was Black History Month.

What do you think Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., would think of special days and months set aside for people, based solely on race and sex?

In this Digital Age, people are judged by race and sex more than ever.

Affirmative action is government-sanctioned judgement of people, based solely on race and sex.

And International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month, and Black History Month is corporate-sanctioned and society-sanctioned judgement of people, based solely on race and sex.

When are people going to be judged not by race or sex, but by content of character?

When is Dr. King’s dream going to be realized?

LET’S PUT A STOP TO THIS

http://koreandogs.org/pc2018/

THEY ARE THE POLITICIANS

We can support the troops without supporting the war.

And they can support the war without supporting the troops.

We are the people.

And they are the politicians—both Democratic and Republican.


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