Posts Tagged 'treasure mapping'

BESTOWED BEFOREHAND

Sometimes it’s good to step back from one’s blog, and try to see it as someone else would.  This is one of those moments.  I downloaded some photos of Madeleine Stowe earlier today, for a display on my blog.  Then I asked myself why.  Why do I like to post pictures of things and people I desire, admire, or envy?

There is a sheet of poster paper on my living-room wall, with pictures from magazines covering it.  I made it several years ago, at the Unity Church here in Pensacola.  It was for a treasure-mapping workshop, and it was one of the most enjoyable group activities I’ve ever done. 

All of the necessary materials were provided:  poster paper, glue, scissors, various stickers, and a mountain of magazines of different genres.  Going through the magazines, we cut out pictures of things and people we envied, admired, or especially desired.  Then we pasted them on our treasure maps.  The idea, as explained by the instructor, is to make a collage of things and people you desire–then step back and visualize having these things and people in your life.  Supposedly, in visualizing what you desire, you’ll eventually get it. 

I don’t have a camera, so I can’t show you my treasure map.  But it’s covered with scenes of beautiful places, magnificent animals, great works of art, and of course gorgeous women–and finished off with stickers of hundred-dollar bills.

I haven’t gotten any of these, since.  Either the visualization is questionable (like astrology), or I lack faith.  Yet the treasure map is still special to me, and I’ll always keep it.  Because it reveals so much about me as a person–and that is definitely worth the time and effort that went into making it. 

I learned, at a very early age, the importance of self-examination.  Yet almost as important is self-actualization–the practice of visualizing what you want to become, and what you want to attain.  For though your dreams may be unattainable, they give you something for which to live.


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